Murals

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· Allen House, my first mural.
· In the Kitchen, a mural at Hunters Point Shipyard.
· Amateur Artists’ Day, in the lands east of San Francisco.
· Through the Tunnel to Honey Hill, a residential mural project.
· Mural Painting at Cowden Automotive, in a business setting.
· Can You See It From the Moon
· Getting the Word Out
· Ongoing and Upcoming

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Ongoing and Upcoming

The mural I painted in the private residence on Honey Hill intensified my interest in large brushstrokes. Between finishing it and starting the Cowden Automotive mural, I painted a group of works in larger format than I usually use. Keith Haring’s paintings on drop cloths also encouraged me to expand the gestures with which I create images.

I read Haring’s journals and some of his books for children in the late 1990s after I saw the huge, beautifully installed retrospective of his work in San Francisco.

Perhaps it was Haring’s journals that got me started imagining conversations with other artists. What would be the results, I asked myself, if David Hockney, Howard Hodgkin, and I were to paint a triptych together? I saw three arched panels on a large studio wall. We each would use one. Most of the time we would work during the same hours, conscious of each other’s progress, but not necessarily conversing about what we were doing.

Here are the results. The one with the circular form in the upper half is what my imagination conceived of as David Hockney’s contribution to the project. The one with the central arched red form and three tan lozenges below is mine. The panel with dark blue, yellow, and green as the main colors is what my brush put there while I thought of Howard Hodgkin’s compositions.

Of David Hockney Of Tanya Joyce Of Howard Hodgkins
Photos: Tanya Joyce

My interest in ink brushstrokes continues. Here is the central section of a fifteen foot long composition done with several kinds of brushes. The pale gray crisscrosses are done with a house painter’s roller. The dark, dry brush sides were done with a kitchen broom. The curving arcs were painted with a foam brush on a wheel. It looks rather like a pizza cutter and is designed to use in tight corners for house painting finish work. I walked in some thinned acrylic to make the pale blue areas and splattered some drops to unite it all.

Broom, Foam, and Feet
Photo: Tanya Joyce

At the moment, I am designing compositions for trim in a Berkeley kitchen and for a garden backdrop in San Francisco. Large scale has also resulted in some mythic figures of mermaids and skeletons who plan to make their public debut just before Halloween 2002 at San Francisco Open Studios.

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